How to Write a Living Will in the USA

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living-will

Few Americans have a living will

Author Paulo Coelho said this to sober us up: “People live as if they will never die and they die as if they had never lived.” A stamp of approval on this is, for example, the disregard that Americans have on making a living will; according to FindLaw, a legal resource, under a third of Americans have written a living will.
Are you one of those two thirds without a will? Read on the importance of a living will and how to make a living will.

Reasons why you need a living will

Incidentally, a living will is a legal statement detailing your wishes on end-of-life care. If you give scant credence to a living will, this will make you consider it and, on sober reflection, realize what you are missing out.

First, you’ll give your next of kin peace of mind upon severe illness. How would you want your end-of-life care handled–to die normally or be placed on life support despite all odds? You can decide for them.

Second, you will spare your family from any family wrangles relating to your estate upon your death.

Third, it is hassle-free and void of legal complications. Lastly, you don’t necessarily have to tell anyone except your physician for medical record keeping.

How to make a living will

Making a living will is hassle-free and, yes, you can prepare will without lawyer; you only need a will guardian, will solicitor, will executor, be an adult, and sane. Though not accorded the authority of attorney, the will guardian and solicitor and executor will implement your will accordingly; they will take care of your children, draw up your will, and distribute your property upon death, respectively.
It’s easier to update your will or, better yet, make a new will if there are new developments; for examples, if you chose a specific wife but have since divorced her, relocation as some USA states are state-specific.
To sum it up, a living will is a must-have for any person in America. It’ll solve you unnecessary end-of-life care and in inheritance tussles.

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